How Old Do I Need to Be to Be the Beneficiary of a Fiancé Visa?

In general, you must be at least 18 years of age to be the beneficiary of a fiancé visa.

How Old Do I Need to Be to Be the Beneficiary of a Fiancé Visa?

The K-1 fiancé visa is a great way for you to come to the United States to plan your upcoming wedding. However, in order to benefit from this visa, you must meet the strict requirements enforced by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). One of these requirements is that you and your fiancé must legally be able to marry one another. Depending on your age, you may or may not be able to legally get married in the United States.

In order to be eligible for a K-1 fiancé visa, the USCIS requires that you:

  • Intend to marry a United States citizen within 90 days after you enter the United States
  • Met your fiancé within the last two years; and
  • Are legally able to marry

Assuming you meet the first two requirements, you should make sure that you are old enough to be the beneficiary of a K-1 fiancé visa. This means that you must be over the age of consent, which is typically 18 years old. If you are under the age of 18, you are most likely underage in the United States. However, since each state makes their own laws, the minimum age requirement depends on the rules in the state where you plan to get married.

State Specific Rules

Most states require that a couple be 18 years or older to marry with the exception of Nebraska which requires a couple to be 19 years old and Mississippi which sets the minimum age at 21. There is an age requirement in order to protect you and make sure you are making the best decision for yourself. If you have not yet reached the age of majority in the state you wish to marry, you may be able to obtain parental and/or judicial consent to get married. In this case, your parent or a judge would determine if getting married is the best option for you.

The minimum legal age to get married with parental and/or judicial consent by state is listed below. Keep in mind that the minimum age to marry in each state is subject to change, and the information listed below is only current as of the date of this article. You should research the specific state you plan to get married in for the most up to date information.

  • Alabama: 16 with parental consent
  • Alaska: 16 with parental consent; 14 with both parental and judicial consent
  • Arizona: 16 with parental consent; No minimum age with both parental and judicial consent
  • Arkansas: 16 for females and 17 for males with parental consent; No minimum age if pregnant and have both parental and judicial consent.
  • California: No minimum age with both parental and judicial consent
  • Colorado: 16 with parental consent; No minimum age with both parental and judicial consent
  • Connecticut: 16 with parental consent; No minimum age with both parental and judicial consent
  • District of Columbia: 16 with parental consent
  • Delaware: No minimum with judicial consent
  • Florida: 16 with parental consent; No minimum age if pregnant and have both parental and judicial consent
  • Georgia: 16 with parental consent
  • Hawaii: 16 with parental consent; 15 with both parental and judicial consent
  • Idaho: 16 with parental consent; No minimum age with both parental and judicial consent
  • Illinois: 16 with parental consent
  • Indiana: 17 with parental consent; 15 with both parental and judicial consent
  • Iowa: 16 with parental consent
  • Kansas: 16 with parental consent; 15 with both parental and judicial consent
  • Kentucky: 16 with parental consent; No minimum if pregnant with both parental and judicial consent
  • Louisiana: 16 with parental consent; No minimum with both parental and judicial consent
  • Maine: 16 with parental consent; No minimum with both parental and judicial consent
  • Maryland: 16 with parental consent; 15 if pregnant with both parental and judicial consent
  • Massachusetts: 14 for males and 12 for females with parental consent
  • Michigan: 16 with parental consent
  • Minnesota: 16 with parental consent
  • Mississippi: No minimum age with parent and judicial consent
  • Missouri: 15 with parental consent; No minimum with both parental and judicial consent
  • Montana: 16 with parental consent
  • Nebraska: 17 with parental consent
  • Nevada: 16 with parental consent; No minimum with both parental and judicial consent
  • New Hampshire: 13 for females and 14 for males with parental consent
  • New Jersey: 16 with parental consent; No minimum with both parental and judicial consent
  • New Mexico: 16 with parental consent; No minimum with both parental and judicial consent
  • New York: 16 with parental consent; 14 with both parental and judicial consent
  • North Carolina: 16 with parental consent; 14 with both parental and judicial consent
  • North Dakota: 16 with parental consent
  • Ohio: 16 for females with parental consent
  • Oklahoma: 16 with parental consent; No minimum if pregnant with both parental and judicial consent
  • Oregon: 17 with parental consent
  • Pennsylvania: 16 with parental consent; No minimum with parental and judicial consent
  • Rhode Island: 16 for females with parental consent
  • South Carolina: 16 with parental consent; No minimum if pregnant with both parental and judicial consent
  • South Dakota: 16 with parental consent
  • Tennessee: 16 with parental consent
  • Texas: 16 with parental consent; No minimum with both parental and judicial consent
  • Utah: 16 with parental consent; 15 with both parental and judicial consent
  • Vermont: 16 with parental consent
  • Virginia: 16 with parental consent; No minimum with both parental and judicial consent
  • Washington: 17 with parental consent; No minimum with both parental and judicial consent
  • West Virginia: 16 with parental consent; No minimum with both parental and judicial consent
  • Wisconsin: 16 with parental consent
  • Wyoming: 16 with parental consent; No minimum with both parental and judicial consent

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